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The News That Didn’t Make It: Episode Two

Each week, our #StageDoorLive News Writer / Researcher Hillary Dziminski chronicles her interaction with the news of the week. Some of it that made it to the show, and other bits that didn’t… but they matter damn it. This Week: New film production guidelines in Sweden and Denmark, Gaeltacht Courses Cancelled, Creative Scotland funding, Zombie by The Cranberries, and Singing during Covid-19.
Photo by Brano Hudak from FreeImages

Each week, our #StageDoorLive News Writer / Researcher Hillary Dziminski chronicles her interaction with the news of the week. Some of it that made it to the show, and other bits that didn’t… but they matter damn it. Watch the news that did make it in #StageDoorLive Episode Two.

Hello, world! (World. Bit ambitious, probably.)

It’s your friendly neighborhood news researcher, Hillary, here to share some of the headlines that didn’t make it into this week’s Stage Door Live news segment. In no particular order, here’s a few of the stories that I may or may not have read in preparation for this week’s episode.

THE NEW RULEBOOK: Guidelines for Film Production in Sweden and Denmark

I love Nordic dramas as much as the next clinically depressed arts graduate, so I’m not sure if this story fills me with gleeful anticipation or just exacerbates my already inflamed existential dread. The highlight of this article for me is that interior shoots require each person inside to have a personal bubble of 4m². It’s unclear to me if this rule applies to performers or is limited to crew, but I’m already imagining the layers of additional tension in the already deliciously tense Scandi-crime series I love so much. Read Here.

Summer Gaeltacht Courses Cancelled Due to Coronavirus

A short read but an important one. As a polyglot with a B.A. in French and a certified TEFL teacher, this one strikes a particularly resonant chord for me. Since I moved to Ireland five years ago, I’ve been endlessly curious about the Irish language. Its political significance (see Brian Friel’s beautiful play Translations) and its continued presence in daily life is somewhat of a curiosity for an American transplant. At the top of my list of Things to do in Ireland Before I Die (or Move) is to learn Irish; to see thousands of young people now deprived of an opportunity to immerse themselves in the language is heartbreaking. Read Here.

Creative Scotland Confirms £2m Extra Funding for Freelancers

Would that I could tell a lie, world; but alas, I cannot. I didn’t read past the headline. I couldn’t. Having read article after article about the (bleak) arts funding landscape here on the Irish homefront, my jealousy (and perhaps bitterness) stopped me from reading on. I promise to read it later. Read Here.

Zombie by The Cranberries Becomes First Irish Song to Break One Billion Plays on Youtube

TUUUUUUUUNE.
Okay but seriously. Great song.
Read Here.

‘Singing can be therapy during the Covid-19 shutdown’.

Eimear Crehan says, “At one point in your life, singing was natural, a way to pass the time, a habit to cheer you up, a sign of your chirpiness, a pastime, something lovely and a way for you to express yourself. Something changed along the way and made singing something that is difficult and embarrassing, something that exposes you in a way that’s uncomfortable.” Read Here.

The TL;DR summary of this article: sing as if no one is listening.
And you know what?
Right now, no one is listening.

No one is watching, no one is criticising. Because we’re all in the same boat right now. We’re all grieving and stressing and overthinking and staring out windows and baking banana bread and just trying to find ways to get through this.

So fuck it. Sing a song.

Wash your hands, you filthy animals.

See you next week.

H x

(Headline Photo by Brano Hudak from FreeImages)

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